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Webcomics Everyone Should Read

the-world-is-a-corner:

Because they’re all wonderful and deserve to be promoted!

1. Blindsprings, by Kadi Fedoruk

A group of three young Orphic witches living in a country whose Orphic royalty was overthrown and which is now ruled by the Academist Society. Oh, and one of those witches is a 300 years old Princess with huge magical hair.

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2. Nimonaby Noelle Stevenson

You’ll think this webcomic is about Ballister Blackheart and his hero-villain fling with Ambrosius Goldenloin and also their adopted teen shapeshifter Nimona, but it’s not.

Well, it is, but it’s also about tearing your heart from your chest and making you weep at two in the morning because you thought this was gonna be cute, god dammit.

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3. Agents of the Realmby Mildred Louis

Magical Girls of Color! One of them is Brazilian! The transformation sequence is the most beautiful thing to ever be web-comiced. Ever.

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4. Namesakeby Megan Lavey-Heaton and  Isabelle Melançon

Namesakes are people who share a name with famous fictional characters, and are therefore chosen to re-enact their stories in parallel worlds. Then the main heroine, Emma, is one day sent to Oz.

If you are wondering what the hell is Emma doing in Oz if she’s not named Dorothy, buckle up, because so much shit is gonna happen.

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5. Beauty and the Beast, by Megan Kearney

The classical Beauty and the Beast tale, except it’s so ridiculously fucking adorable it’s almost incapacitating. 

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6. Alice and the Nightmare, by Michelle Krivanek

It’s still just beginning, so I don’t know what’s up yet - but apparently class prejudice has something to do with it, and her eyes glow murderous pink when she’s pissed. 

If I had to guess, I’d say she can use that to kill people.

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7. 100 Days of Night, by Anastasia Symeonidou and Mariló Delgado

A retelling of Hades’ and Persephone’s myth, featuring Hades’ glorious nose, Persephone’s flawlessnessness, and a whole lot of yummy character-centred wordlbuilding. 

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isabelladeste:

FAERIE TALE MEME
↳ Characters: the Beast from Beauty and the Beast (7/7)

Beauty was sadly terrified at his horrid form, but she took courage as well as she could.

(via katerayearth)

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bifanoland:

Was digging through my old work folder and came across these roughs from last summer. They were originally going to be shown at a theme-park gallery run by a company that rhymes with “Bisney”. Needless to say, there was some weirdness with contract stuff and the project fell through. Thought it would be fun to share these anyhow!

(via fairytalemood)

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Beauty and The Beast is updated!
Today: Ogres are like onions… no, sorry. Amaranth. We’re doing metaphors about amaranth.

Beauty and The Beast is updated!

Today: Ogres are like onions… no, sorry. Amaranth. We’re doing metaphors about amaranth.

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whatwouldwaltdo:

Okay, so these were the characters from a comic I was working on all last semester - a 1920s version of Beauty and the Beast, which I may or may not post here in the future. It didn’t get to be quite as fleshed out as I wanted (I half-want to make a longer version…then again, I sorta don’t. Lol), but the implication at the end was that the Beast doesn’t change back in the end and they’re both okay with that. The Beast (still haven’t given him a proper name; “Amicus” was a placeholder) was a big furry monster a long time ago, but his fur and parts of his skin just kinda fell out because he was getting so old (but still immortal, somehow???? Idek). He was fun to draw, with his gorilla skull head and Rasputin hands.
My problem with BatB, even though it’s my favorite fairy tale and I’ve seen and read so many versions, is that the ending is a cop-out. It undermines the whole point of the story’s message - “Love someone for who they are on the inside and not what they look like…but then you’ll get a physically handsome prince in the end, so never mind.” Yeah, no. And I get it - people don’t want to think about the idea of a woman and a monster getting together because they see some inherent bestiality. Well, I dunno, the Beast is always a pretty sentient, conscious, and self-aware creature with his own thoughts, ideas, and feelings, things most animals are not, at least not in the way people are. So, again, I’m not sure if it makes me a freak for wanting a story to stick to its premise (or being turned into a teratophile, or whatever), but there it is, I guess.

whatwouldwaltdo:

Okay, so these were the characters from a comic I was working on all last semester - a 1920s version of Beauty and the Beast, which I may or may not post here in the future. It didn’t get to be quite as fleshed out as I wanted (I half-want to make a longer version…then again, I sorta don’t. Lol), but the implication at the end was that the Beast doesn’t change back in the end and they’re both okay with that. The Beast (still haven’t given him a proper name; “Amicus” was a placeholder) was a big furry monster a long time ago, but his fur and parts of his skin just kinda fell out because he was getting so old (but still immortal, somehow???? Idek). He was fun to draw, with his gorilla skull head and Rasputin hands.

My problem with BatB, even though it’s my favorite fairy tale and I’ve seen and read so many versions, is that the ending is a cop-out. It undermines the whole point of the story’s message - “Love someone for who they are on the inside and not what they look like…but then you’ll get a physically handsome prince in the end, so never mind.” Yeah, no. And I get it - people don’t want to think about the idea of a woman and a monster getting together because they see some inherent bestiality. Well, I dunno, the Beast is always a pretty sentient, conscious, and self-aware creature with his own thoughts, ideas, and feelings, things most animals are not, at least not in the way people are. So, again, I’m not sure if it makes me a freak for wanting a story to stick to its premise (or being turned into a teratophile, or whatever), but there it is, I guess.

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Beauty and the Beast poster fanart by Chernin

Beauty and the Beast poster fanart by Chernin

(Source: disneyfanartftw)

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Sabrina Writes Sez…

sabrinawrites replied to your photoset “It sounds like your story is about a man who must stay with a woman…”

As a writer I’m going to add that when you write towards stereotypes (reversed or otherwise), your work ends up reading stereotypically and flat. Think of your characters as people, not types, and you can’t go wrong.
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zombie-spiders:

royals-and-quotes:

Vintage Medieval Weddings Dresses

I love these so much

(via hoop-skirts-and-corsets)

Tags: ALL OF THESE
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queenuglykingbeastly:

batbcomic:

It sounds like your story is about a man who must stay with a woman who has no redeeming qualities, despite not wanting to be there. That sounds a bit like a babysitting job, rather than a relationship between equals. Could the issue be that your story is presenting an emotionally needy and manipulative woman and a philandering and uncaring man as an ideal of romance? Everything about the relationship you’ve mentioned screams unhealthy, if not outright abusive. It also assumes that men are inherently unfaithful and women inherently shrewish — a damaging stereotype the media still can’t shake its addiction to.

The Traditional Beauty and the Beast structure is generally that a young woman of virtue comes to understand the inherent goodness of her beastly suitor and consents to marry him, thus lifting the curse of his ugly form. Modern variations tend to take a different approach, and make the story about a beastly man who must learn to control his base instincts or temper and become worthy of a virtuous woman. In both, when played straight, it’s about good qualities winning out.

There are, of course, variations that are more about female obedience — East of The Sun, West of The Moon, Bluebeard and similar are all about the whole “it-would-have-been-fine-if-you-had-just-done-what-I -told you-to” thing, though disobedience does sometimes result in adventure.

There are also many, many variations that are about the woman getting herself out of a life threatening situation while keeping her dangerous husband in the dark about it (Prince Lindworm, The Royal Ram, etc.)

When the genders are reversed the story is more often about a man keeping his promise to or obeying an unappealing woman, (The Loathly Lady, The Tortoise Bride, The Frog Princess etc.) or about him losing his wife due to not obeying her wishes (The Crane Wife, Selkie legends, etc.)

Off the top of my head, I think you may want to look at The White Cat and Riquet with the Tuft for examples of reversed BATB, and less-than-ideal stereotypes, respectively. You may also try reading The Uses of Enchantment for a psychological examination of fairy tales, and The Bloody Chamber for an example of how to invert and subvert traditional stories succesfully (Lady of The House of Love, which I’ve posted here before, features a very feminine-stereotyped vampire, but plays out fascinatingly). You might also find Beauty and The Beast: Visions and Revisions of an Old Tale as well as From The Beast to The Blonde useful.

Overall, I think it sounds like you were trying to critique stereotypes, but wound up just playing right into them. You’re going to have to be very, very judicious in your use of stereotype in order to structure a story that shows an awareness of what you are doing. Otherwise, as your professors say, it is going to read as sincere

Also, just to add:

A lot of the “undesirable” traits the female beast has, are actually preferred in popular culture. Shyness, lack of confidence, and hiding from other are seen as ideal because our culture thinks women should be seen not heard. It also means a man can come along and secure her from herself by assuring her that she IS beautiful or wonderful. 

Negative feminine stereotypes are things like vanity (AKA self-confidence in your looks), outspokenness, really just accepting yourself as is, and sexual promiscuity (which can even just be “acting like a tease”). In most romances the heroine isn’t allowed to like herself without a man’s permission, and god-forbid she knowingly uses her looks and charm to attract attention or desire.

So for your fem-beast maybe give her more of those qualities? Like, she’s a beast but she’s still loud and doesn’t recoil from attention. In the traditional Beauty and the Beast stories, the Beast plays a very feminine part by patiently waiting to be rescued from the curse and then dying when he thinks Beauty doesn’t like him. So if you’re only playing loose with the story you could have fem-Beast more active and basically have all the negative feminine qualities.

And like, her having all those “bad” qualities could be part of why boy-Beauty leaves, having internalized so much misogyny that he can’t accept her being active instead of passive.

I DID think your ending was pretty neat, and could work really well if the fem-Beast feels super sad but moves on with her life and maybe ends with her falling for someone else? That would nicely skewer the stereotype that women should only be faithful to one person ever and are never allowed to move on.

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freaking-ray-of-sunshine:

I got two this time! ouo’

Uwaaa, so pretty!

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Anonymous said: (1) I've been working on a little project for a comics class; a reverse Beauty and the Beast with a lot of artistic liberties, playing about with gender roles and such. The beast is an amalgam of stereotypically negative feminine traits (emotional, lack of confidence, shyness, hiding from others, clinginess), and the beauty is just as flawed, rather than good-natured and a model hero. But instead of having the necessity that the beauty falls in love with the beast, my comic is playing with the

Hi Anon! I’ve replied to you on the blog along with a photoset of your question, so it would all be in one post!

Tags: Anonymous
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It sounds like your story is about a man who must stay with a woman who has no redeeming qualities, despite not wanting to be there. That sounds a bit like a babysitting job, rather than a relationship between equals. Could the issue be that your story is presenting an emotionally needy and manipulative woman and a philandering and uncaring man as an ideal of romance? Everything about the relationship you’ve mentioned screams unhealthy, if not outright abusive. It also assumes that men are inherently unfaithful and women inherently shrewish — a damaging stereotype the media still can’t shake its addiction to.

The Traditional Beauty and the Beast structure is generally that a young woman of virtue comes to understand the inherent goodness of her beastly suitor and consents to marry him, thus lifting the curse of his ugly form. Modern variations tend to take a different approach, and make the story about a beastly man who must learn to control his base instincts or temper and become worthy of a virtuous woman. In both, when played straight, it’s about good qualities winning out.

There are, of course, variations that are more about female obedience — East of The Sun, West of The Moon, Bluebeard and similar are all about the whole “it-would-have-been-fine-if-you-had-just-done-what-I -told you-to” thing, though disobedience does sometimes result in adventure.

There are also many, many variations that are about the woman getting herself out of a life threatening situation while keeping her dangerous husband in the dark about it (Prince Lindworm, The Royal Ram, etc.)

When the genders are reversed the story is more often about a man keeping his promise to or obeying an unappealing woman, (The Loathly Lady, The Tortoise Bride, The Frog Princess etc.) or about him losing his wife due to not obeying her wishes (The Crane Wife, Selkie legends, etc.)

Off the top of my head, I think you may want to look at The White Cat and Riquet with the Tuft for examples of reversed BATB, and less-than-ideal stereotypes, respectively. You may also try reading The Uses of Enchantment for a psychological examination of fairy tales, and The Bloody Chamber for an example of how to invert and subvert traditional stories succesfully (Lady of The House of Love, which I’ve posted here before, features a very feminine-stereotyped vampire, but plays out fascinatingly). You might also find Beauty and The Beast: Visions and Revisions of an Old Tale as well as From The Beast to The Blonde useful.

Overall, I think it sounds like you were trying to critique stereotypes, but wound up just playing right into them. You’re going to have to be very, very judicious in your use of stereotype in order to structure a story that shows an awareness of what you are doing. Otherwise, as your professors say, it is going to read as sincere

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nemesis-black-orchid:

DAY 434. Beast by Cryptid-Creations
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Beauty and The Beast is updated!
Today: Aster and Phlox

Beauty and The Beast is updated!

Today: Aster and Phlox

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"When is a monster not a monster?
Oh, when you love it."

— Caitlyn Siehl (via insanity-here-i-come)

(via wiseabsol)